Tag: Austin

Every season, we ask someone we admire to curate a Sample Set of her favorite scents. This time around, we invited Tsh Oxenreider—the author and voice of The Art of Simple, a blog and podcast about living well and ignoring the rest—to give us her picks, which you can get here.

While we had her, we also had to ask Tsh how she does it. And by “it” we mean write, edit, podcast, travel, raise three children, and just plain live the life we see / hear / read about in her work. (She does it all from Georgetown, Texas, a stone’s throw away from our hometown of Austin.)

Read what she told us after the jump.

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Welcome to the latest in our series of interviews with people we admire. Kevin Fink is one of those people. He’s the man behind Emmer & Rye, one of the best restaurants in our hometown of Austin, Texas, if not the country. (Just ask Bon Appetit or Food & Wine or any number of publications singing its praises.)

What makes it so good? Much of it comes from Kevin’s mindful approach to food, which he honed at such iconic spots as Noma and The French Laundry. Everything he does he does with purpose, whether it’s exclusively using whole animals or buying heritage grains. These things ensure the food tastes better, sure, but they’re also the right thing to do—things that support the community, reduce waste, foster relationships with farmers and growers. We aim for a similar approach with our fragrances and candles, and that’s why we asked Kevin to host a special scent dinner when we launched last year.

We caught up with Kevin recently, and he was as busy as ever. He and his wife had their first child, a baby boy, this fall. And soon, he will open Henbit, a restaurant that brings the same mindful approach to food as Emmer & Rye, but for a more casual diner. (It will open at Fareground, an upcoming marketplace in downtown Austin.) As you might expect, Fink is deeply thoughtful and considerate, precise with how he speaks, occasionally cutting himself off mid-sentence to layer on a new idea, as if hurrying to match the pace of his own thoughts. We just tried our best to keep up.

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